E-Waste Inquiries

Regarding question 1 & 2 I actually have a joint answer. You might remember from the house hold refuse discussion that I was the member of the class that may have made you cringe (if you’re over due for a tetanus shot) with the plethora of  various metal based objects littered across my floor. One such object was an opened Xbox. During winter break my brother and I became extremely nostalgic for all of the old video games of our childhood. We considered a few ebay auctions for the different systems and the games but quickly realized our lack of storage space would be an issue. Plus we didn’t see a reason to spend a few hundred for a distraction.

We learned we could ‘mod’ an original Xbox and store Nintendo, Super Nintendo, Sega Genesis, Nintendo 64, Playstation and arcade games on it. For the remainder of winter break our bookmarks consisted of various sites that we marked for guides on the conversion process and also sites listing links for the games. Later on there existed a folder on my desktop and that folder eventually became too big and was moved to an external hard drive. While the Xbox is now setup and running we kept all that bookmarks and the filled external hard drive just incase we need to do it again. Unfortunately I messed up a few times and as a result we had to strip three other Xboxs for parts. These machines are still in my room stacked in the corner. They’ll probably stay for a while just incase we need parts. An attempt to save money and space resulted in the consumption of both physical and virtual space.

Sorting unfortunately is sort of a hobby, at least the time I spend on sorting you would think its a hobby. I’ve spent hours sorting and creating folders for my files. The afore mentioned game files were all organized according to system and were broken down into folders and alphabetized. I suppose I subconsciously recognize the messy haphazard nature of my physical existence and sought out order for my digital files.

Advertisements

1 Comment»

  cindypound wrote @

moding is a great example of re-use/re-processing. very cool, thanks for sharing!


Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: